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Home / Advice / Anxiety / Food and mental health: What you eat impacts how you feel so lets get experimenting

Food and mental health: What you eat impacts how you feel so lets get experimenting

By: Silvia Ribeiro

Updated: 25 April 2019

Food and mental health: What you eat impacts how you feel so lets get experimenting

We don’t all like the same foods, in the same vein we don’t all respond well or poorly to the same foods so how do we know what certain foods do for and against our mental health? Every day there’s a blog/article/review of some food or another that is alleged to be the new super food. But are there foods that can actually help with mental health conditions? According to a recent article food helps depression on the Washington post which considered the role of food and its ability to influence mood. So what are the foods that are thought to positively and negatively impact mood? According to Dr. Jordan B. Peterson, his many ailments were all but cured with his diet change, not recommending what he’s eats, salted beef and only salted beef, but it does raise the question, if what we consume impacts our hormones, cell development and neural connectivity experimenting with what works best for us when we are constantly feeling low seems something to try. Share with us your favourite foods to feel fabulous ! Comment below 🙂

By Silvia Ribeiro

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